European Commission
Italian Presidency of the Council of the European Union
TOBE 2014 – 3rd BioEconomy Stakeholders' Conference

BioEconomy Stakeholders' Conference

"From sectors to system, from concept to reality"

Outcome 8th October

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8.45 – 9.45 Cavour Hall – Giolitti Hall    relive-logo-tobe2014

Formal opening session

  • Carmen Vela - State Secretary for Research, Development and Innovation Spanish Ministry for Economy and Competitiveness
    Bioeconomy: An approach from Spain
    Description...
    The main content is the currently design of the new Spanish Strategy of Bioeconomy. The explanation of the different perspectives: technological, economical, social and legal.
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9.45 – 11.00 Cavour Hall – Giolitti Hall relive-logo-tobe2014

Connecting the challenges: exploring the relationship between the different societal challenges that the bioeconomy can help to address

  • Gunter Pauli - The ZERI Foundation – Job Role Founder
    Inclusive Growth: an competitive business model capable of eradicating poverty, while generating jobs and working with available natural resources
    Description...
    The present competitive model prescribes to pursue economies of scale, with ever lower marginal costs, offering cheaper products with an acceptable quality. Time has come to reassess the scarce resources and shift towards the generation of more value cascading nutrients, energy and matter in order to respond to the basic needs of all including water, nutritious food, housing, energy, health, jobs, mobility, waste management. Our present consumption and production model has often designed solutions that may make marketing sense, but that make no sense from a functional or an environmental point of view. Plastics bags which are used for no more than 20 minutes have a half life of one hundred years! This reinforces the need to match
    resource with function. This is why there is an increasing need to change the rules of the game, create solutions that are competitive while dramatically improving the social and environmental performance. On the basis of concrete examples as varied as coffee and thistles, we will demonstrate the viability of this fresh approach to the biobased economy.
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11.30 – 13.00 Connecting the biomass: illustrating the bioeconomy system in action by following the flows of biomass and residues

Giolitti Hall relive-logo-tobe2014

Parallel Session 1 – Biobased Chemicals and Energy

Italian Biorefineries

  • Catia Bastioli - Novamont S.p.A. – Job Role CEO
    Novamont and Matrìca: a concrete example of fully integrated biorefinery in Italy
    Description...
    Third-generation integrated biorefineries – dedicated to the production of a wide range of chemical products through innovative and low-impact processes – represent a concrete example of bioeconomy and an interesting opportunity to promote the growth and employment of local areas.
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  • Giovanni Bolcheni Managing Director – Biochemtex S.p.A.
    Biorefineries for Advanced Biofuels and Biochemicals
    Description...
    After years of debate, the chemical and advanced biofuels demonstrate a long term sustainability and economical convenience. Biochemtex opens a new era consolidating the evolution with the first industrial plant to produce ethanol in the world. The positive impact of the energy recovered from Byproduct. The developments for the second generation Biorafinery.
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BEACON Project: Creating green jobs in rural Wales – RegioStar2014 Award


Cavour Hall relive-logo-tobe2014

Parallel Session 2 – Food and Feed

CEREVAL – the Austrian bran biorefinery project

  • Markus PrantlManager Corporate Development – GoodMills Group GmbH
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  • Wolfgang KneifelDepartment of Food Science & Technology, University of Natural Resources and Life Sciences Vienna, Austria (Universität für Bodenkultur Wien, BOKU) – Professor, Head of Department, Head of the Christian Doppler-Research Laboratory for Innovative Bran Biorefinery
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Sustainable tunafish from the catching to the table

  • Emma TomaselliRina Services S.p.a. – Health and value chain development sector manager
    Description...
    The example will be focused on the sustainable fishing, explaining a certification experience on the Tuna fish value chain. The certification choosen is according the Friend of the Sea standard for sustainable fishing, with an Italian origin, and a worldwide diffusion, on the wild catch and traceability. The case history takes as testimonial Nino Castiglione, an Italian Company, based in Sicily, particularly open and active on the bioeconomy themes, who has recently achieved the Friend of the Sea certification for the production of canned tuna fish and is developing a cogeneration project in its plant. Besides, the great retailers point of view will be introduced as a witness of an entity facing with the consumers. The example will be concluded by the Fishery Department of the Sicily Region, offering the point of view of the Public Administration and illustrating the efforts planned to give a hint to the bioeconomy development in the area.
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14.15 – 15.00 Cavour Hall relive-logo-tobe2014
Proposals for action

  • Dorette CorbeyCoordinator of Thematic Working Group “Sustainable Biomass Supply for a Growing Bioeconomy
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  • Joanna Dupont-InglisEuropaBio – Director, Industrial Biotechnology
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  • Annette WijeringManager, Agri Knowledge Department Dutch delegate to SCAR, vice chair of JP-FACCE – Ministry of Economic Affairs, Directorate-General for Agro
    SCAR contribution to stimulate the bio-economy
    Description...
    The Standing Committee on Agriculture consists of 27 EU members, 11 observers and the Commission. These members are in charge of national public research & innovation funding in all areas of the KBBE.
    SCAR advises the Commission in the broad area of research & innovation, e.g. on the framework programmes and through foresights. SCAR has several active working groups of national representatives. Some of them are particularly dedicated to the area of bio-economy.
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15.00 – 16.30 Creating the key enabling conditions for the bioeconomy

Cavour Hall relive-logo-tobe2014
Parallel Session 1 – Human capital: getting the right people with the right skills for the rights jobs

  • Peter OlesenChairman of the Governing Board of the European Institute of Innovation and Technology
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  • Jesper Lund-LarsenPolitical Advisor – United federation of Danish Workers 3F
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Sella Hall relive-logo-tobe2014
Parallel Session 2 –  Social capital: addressing the role and concerns of citizens and consumers

  • Lynn FrewerNewcastle University – Professor, Food and Society
    Different applications of GM and the bioeconomy. Differences in societal acceptance.
    Description...
    Social, (including that related to public perceptions and attitudes) environmental and economic knowledge regarding GM animals is needed formulate policy recommendations relevant to new developments and applications. The use of GM in farmed animals (aquatic, terrestrial, and pharmaceutical) has been mapped and reviewed, and future trends identified. The potential risks and benefits of GM animals from the perspectives of the production chain (economics and agri-food sector) and the life sciences (human and animal health, environmental impact, animal welfare, and sustainable production) have been mapped, together with ethical and policy concerns (examined through application of combined ethical matrix method and policy workshops). Public perceptions, ethical issues, the competitiveness of EU animal production, and risk-benefit assessments that consider human and animal health, environmental impact, and sustainable production need to be considered in EU policy development. However, few issues were raised with application in the pharmaceutical sector, assuming ethical and economic issues were addressed in policy, but the introduction of agricultural GM animal applications should be considered on a case-by-case basis. In summary, public perceptions of GM animals are generally more negative than towards GM plants, GM animals are perceived more negatively if used for food rather than for pharmaceuticals. A case-by-case assessment of the risks and benefits of GM animals is warranted, although EU governance systems are reasonably well-prepared for their introduction. Public and stakeholder engagement exercises can be useful tools for informing policy development.
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  • George ChrousosBionian Cluster, Greece
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Einaudi Hall relive-logo-tobe2014
Parallel Session 3 – Financial capital: ensuring investment funding

  • Dirk CarrezBiobased Industries Consortium – Executive Director
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  • Gunter FestelFestel Capital – CEO
    Importance of Private and Financial Investors for the Bioeconomy
    Description...
    As in the medical biotechnology area some decades ago, the fast technological de-velopment within industrial biotechnology (IB) has caused numerous new ventures. Venture capital (VC) has become a major capital source for these companies and VC investors have particularly allocated financing to research and development based companies.
    Since early 2000, the net stock of VC investments in IB companies has continuously increased and at the end of 2013 exceeded 3.5 billion US dollars. In 2013, the gross amount of VC money was 386 million US dollars distributed to 20 companies corre-sponding to an average amount of 19.3 million US dollars for each company. The rising capital contribution into the IB sector indicates that it is meanwhile seen as an attractive investment opportunity for VC investors.
    But there is also a worrying trend with severe financial consequences for new IB ventures. More than a decade ago, in the red biotechnology segment, most VC in-vestors shifted their focus towards more matured and thus less risky investment pro-jects and in IB a similar development started to take place. Before 2009, a significant share of the total VC investment volume was allocated to new companies with an age of less than three years. After the financial market crisis the vast majority of VC was directed to more matured companies with an age of four years or more.
    This research was done by Festel Capital in co-operation with ETH Zurich and the Center for European Economic Research. The data were taken from the Zephyr da-tabase of the Bureau van Dijk. Zephyr is the most comprehensive data-base world-wide on corporate financing, initial public offering and mergers & acquisition activi-ties including VC deals.
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  • Barend Verachtertinterim Executive Director of the Joint Undertaking)
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Giolitti Hall relive-logo-tobe2014

Parallel Session 4 – Natural capital: protecting and exploiting biodiversity

  • Stefano BisoffiConsiglio per la Ricerca e la sperimentazione in Agricoltura – Scientific Director
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  • Martin ScholtenGeneral Manager – Wageningen University and Research Centre
    Exploring the potentials to feed the world by Ocean Farming
    Description...
    Yield gap management of marine productivity in perspective of a marine biobased economy
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17.00 – 18.00 Master-classes: practical advice on how to build the bioeconomy

Einaudi Hall relive-logo-tobe2014 

Master-classes 1 – How to mobilise EU funding instruments for the bioeconomy

  • Lorenza BadielloRegione  Emilia Romagna Brussels
    Bioeconomy in the EU: synergies between European Structural and Investment Funds and Horizon 2020
    Description...
    The European Commission has emphasised the need to create synergies between European funding programs. This presentation aims to provide an introduction on how this can be achieved in a bio economy perspective, particularly within the context of European regions and Smart Specialisation Strategies. In so doing the presentation will share the experience of the Region of Emilia-Romagna to illustrate concrete examples of synergies and evaluation tools.
    A major goal for Europe is to increase investments in research and innovation while improving efficiency and quality of the spending. This implies more coordination between policies at European, national and regional level. In particular, synergies are needed between European Structural and Investment Funds (ESIF) and Horizon 2020 (and other competitiveness-related programs). The European Commission is encouraging this process of synergies between funds – as pointed out by a recent European Commission guide (2014, Enabling synergies between European Structural and Investment Funds, Horizon 2020 and other research innovation and competitiveness-related Union programmes, EC Guidelines for policies DG Regional and Urban Policy) – with the purpose to provide elements and recommendations to Member States and a variety of stakeholders in order to more effectively develop and implement projects.
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  • Elisabeth Lustrat  - Vitagora
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Giolitti Hall relive-logo-tobe2014

Master-classes 2 – How to develop coherent public policies for the bioeconomy

  • Marie Blanche TingMinistry of Science and Technology, South Africa – Senior Specialist: Bio-economy
    South Africa’s Bioeconomy Strategy
    Description...
    The South African Bio-economy Strategy was approved by Cabinet and officially launched on 14 January 2014 by the Minister of Science and Technology. The Strategy provides a roadmap on how to develop South Africa’s natural biological resources into commercial products in the fields of health, agriculture and industry.  It builds on the achievements and lessons learnt from the National Biotechnology of 2001.  The achievements of which were the establishment of 14 technology platforms, the creation of 940 jobs, the awarding of 493 bursaries and the creation of 221 products.  However, the strategy was limited in its ability to deal with a fragmented bio-based innovation system, was not able to sustain biotech companies and there was insufficient industry pull.  It was a strategy primarily based on products and services.
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  • Sixten SunabackaHead of the Finnish Bioeconomy Strategy implementation – Ministry of Employment and the Economy of Finland
    An example of Bioeconomy strategy from inside the EU – The Finnish Bioeconomy Strategy: Sustainable growth from bioeconomy
    Description...
    Growth, declining natural resources, loss of biodiversity and climate change challenge us to develop a bio based economy. It is justified to refer to the transition from a fossil economy to a bioeconomy as the next wave of the global economy.
    The bioeconomy is a combination of several primary production and refining sectors and end product markets. The objective of the future bioeconomy is to generate new economic growth and jobs, while reducing environmental risks and ecological scarcity and securing the operating conditions for the nature’s ecosystems.
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Cavour Hall relive-logo-tobe2014
Master-classes 3 – How to measure progress

  • Damien PlanEuropean Commission Joint Research Centre (JRC) – Project Manager for the EU Bioeconomy Observatory
    The Bioeconomy Observatory
    Description...
    The Bioeconomy Observatory is being developed with policy-makers as primary customers, with the core objective to provide them with a reference source of information including authoritative data and analyses on bioeconomy. This information should provide a solid basis for coherent policy decisions to support the development of the bioeconomy in Europe.
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  • Pierre-Alain Schieb - Professor, Chair of Industrial Bioeconomy – NEOMA Business School
    How to Measure Progress? An OECD perspective 
    Description...
    The OECD report, Bioeconomy to 2030: designing a policy agenda, 2009, has recognized the industrial bioeconomy as one of the most promising pillars of the potential bioeconomy with 39% of total gross value added expected in the OECD area by 2030.
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Sella Hall relive-logo-tobe2014
Master-classes 4 – How to manage the interface between marine/coastal and land ecosystems

  • Alice NewtonProfessor and Senior Scientist – CIMA-UALg and NILU-IMPEC –  University of Algarve and norwegian Institute of Air Research
    Sustainable coastal bioeconomy: the LOICZ approach to managing socio-ecological systems
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